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"There's only one Chadwick, and he's not with us," Alonso said.Alonso praised Boseman for his impactful work during his lifetime.RIP:'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman dies of cancer at 43"As a character, what he did elevated us as a company.A Marvel Studios rep declined to comment."It seems to me that our films are films for theatrical distribution," she said.

Marvel Studios EVP “Black Panther” executive producer Victoria Alonso confirmed in an interview with Argentine newspaper Clarín that the 2022 sequel to the hit Marvel action movie will not use a double digital for Chadwick Boseman, who died of cancer on Aug. 28 at the age of 43.

“There’s only one Chadwick, and he’s not with us,” Alonso said. “Our king, unfortunately, has died in real life, not just in fiction, and we are taking a little time to see how we return to the story and what we do to honor this chapter of what has happened to us that was so unexpected, so painful, so terrible, in reality.”

Alonso praised Boseman for his impactful work during his lifetime.

RIP:‘Black Panther’ star Chadwick Boseman dies of cancer at 43

“As a character, what he did elevated us as a company. I know that sometimes two months go by or three months go by in production and one says, already, it was a long time. But it is not a long time, we have to think carefully about what we are going to do, and how, and think about how we are going to honor the franchise.”

A Marvel Studios rep declined to comment.

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In the interview, Alonso also clarified the future of Marvel movies, explaining that though they can be released on Disney+, “we want our films to be seen in the cinema.”

“It seems to me that our films are films for theatrical distribution,” she said. “We always said that we believe in different formats, and it is very important to maintain the custom, the tradition, of watching certain films as a community.”

“With ‘Avengers: Endgame,’ we did as usual: every Friday before a movie comes out, we go to see it with people who had never seen it. If you see it with those 500 people, or the 1,000 people, or the 100 people who were in the cinema, what you feel when you see that movie with other people is something very different from what you feel in the living room with the four, five or six people who live in your house.”