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20 pledges for 2020: Life-changing news has made me question my zero-waste lifestyle

This was supposed to be the blog that I described the strange, frustrating and comic reactions of our friends and family to our zero waste life.Then a few weeks ago, we got a life-changing medical diagnosis out of the blue after a routine test.And the world and the plastic in the ocean, and our fierce zero waste lifestyle, its implications and social awkwardness shrank away.I have always wondered how we would deal with our zero waste life when things got tough.At the first sign of challenge, would we give in and revert back to an easy, 'normal' life? read more...

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20 Pledges for 2020: Is it really possible to achieve zero household waste? Heres how Im trying

We have been a zero waste household since 2018.Climate change: Decade's defining issue in pictures Show all 20 1 /20 Climate change: Decade's defining issue in pictures Climate change: Decade's defining issue in pictures California In this decade, humans have become ever more aware of climate change.Toby Smith of Climate Visuals, an organisation focused on improving how climate change is depicted in the media, says: "Extreme weather and flooding, has and will become more frequent due to climate change.If I pursue zero waste to its limits, will I ultimately find that there are almost no services I can use?Im going to up my game, Im going to go for true zero waste to see what that really means. read more...

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20 pledges for 2020: Im going vegan for the year and beyond but not just for the environmental benefits

Around a year and a half ago, my friend Harry dropped a bombshell: Im going vegan.Our friendship group met this news with ridicule: You cant go vegan, what about all of the places where we eat out?As you're reading this, you're probably thinking 'if this is all about Nando's and chicken, why not just go vegetarian?If Im honest, its not just because its the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on the earth.Going to visit family will be a challenge, when everyone is eating the oily goodness, I won't be able to join in.Birthday parties will be a challenge, outings in general will be too but I'm taking a positive and excited mindset into this. read more...

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20 pledges for 2020: Children's parties are fun and rewarding - but zero waste children's parties are even more so

This time last year, my daughters birthday party involved 20 children under 5 let loose in a forest.And no manic clear up of the village hall before the next party came rolling in.Everyone turned up, even those people from far away who hadnt been able to attend real life parties before.There was no clear up, a lot less stress and so much thought put into the gifts and messages and gestures.Zero waste on lockdown has certainly presented a few challenges that we havent always been sure wed be able to get around. read more...

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'We won': Indigenous group in Canada scoops up billion dollar seafood firm

For generations, Indigenous peoples in Canada have watched, often in frustration, as commercial industries profit from the land and waters their ancestors once harvested.This week, however, excitement replaced irritation as a group of First Nations announced plans to scoop up one of the largest seafood companies in North America.Heralded as the single largest investment in the seafood industry by any Indigenous group in Canada, the landmark deal comes at a critical moment for Indigenous communities in the region, as tensions remain high over their treatied fishing rights.Instead, because of the fractious relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous fishermen, the deal could further inflame tensions.But he also acknowledged the Clearwater deal was the result of years of fighting for a seat at the table. read more...

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Editor's Pick

'We won': Indigenous group in Canada scoops up billion dollar seafood company

For generations, Indigenous peoples in Canada have watched, often in frustration, as commercial industries profit from the land and waters their ancestors once harvested.This week, however, excitement replaced irritation as a group of First Nations announced plans to scoop up one of the largest seafood companies in North America.Heralded as the single largest investment in the seafood industry by any Indigenous group in Canada, the landmark deal comes at a critical moment for Indigenous communities in the region, as tensions remain high over their treatied fishing rights.Instead, because of the fractious relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous fishermen, the deal could further inflame tensions.But he also acknowledged the Clearwater deal was the result of years of fighting for a seat at the table. read more...

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'We packed long underwear and never wore it': Arctic scientists shocked at warming

When the Arctic researchers Jacqueline Grebmeier and Lee Cooper made their annual scientific pilgrimage to frigid seas off Alaska last month, what they found was startling.Last-ditch ideas to save the Arctic ice Read moreWhile the world on average has warmed more than 1C because of human-caused climate change, the Arctic is heating much faster.This year marked the second-biggest sea ice retreat toward the North Pole ever, after 2012.Clams eat the toxic algae, and walruses, diving ducks and humans eat the clams.One study published this year found that marine communities in the Pacific Arctic will see profound changes in response to warming and reductions in sea ice. read more...

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'Some nibbling may have occurred': sea otter pictured trying to eat a horn shark

'Some nibbling may have occurred': sea otter pictured trying to eat a horn sharkA sea otter off the coast of California caused a splash when it was photographed apparently trying to eat a shark though it appears it did not manage to complete its meal.Furry engineers: sea otters in California's estuaries surprise scientists Read morePhotographers Don Henderson and Alice Cahill captured the unusual event, which involved a small horn shark, in Morro Bay last week.There are reports of sea otters capturing skates and rays, but this is the first report of a shark.But as Sea Otter Savvy posted on Twitter: If you watch sea otters long enough you will see a range of sea life brought to the surface.Whether or not the shark seized by the otter managed to bite back, Sea Otter Savvy noted: Not surprisingly, while some nibbling may have occurred, the prey was not consumed.Harris told For the Win Outdoors he was fairly certain the otter was an adult female. read more...

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'Heal the damage': Activists urge Joe Biden to move beyond border security

Some lawmakers along the border find these developments heartening, after Trumps border wall construction has devastated sensitive ecosystems, tribal spaces, and communities, and has been continuously challenged in court.But while weary border activists see a potential ally in the Biden administration, many say that, while his electoral victory brought them a sense of relief, they are hoping for more than a return to the status quo.The Trump administration has used it to bypass protections like the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Air Act.But border activists are not convinced.According to activists, that will require an acknowledgment of Bidens own contribution to the project of border militarization. read more...

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'Dire outlook': scientists say Florida reefs have lost nearly 98% of coral

While overall US coral reefs are in fair condition, along the coast of Florida as little as 2% of original coral cover remainsThe United States coral reefs are in fair condition, according to a recent reef condition status report, but vulnerable to decline.Scientists estimate that along the coast of Florida, where degradation is most severe, perhaps as little as 2% of original coral cover remains.Analyzing records from 2012 to 2018, researchers identify ocean warming and acidification, coral disease and fishing as ongoing threats to coral reefs, indicating a dire outlook for these ecosystems.Unlike years past, when experts credited ocean pollution with worsening coral reefs outlook, Noaa researchers now name climate change as the primary cause of reef degradation.It has been co-sponsored by lawmakers from Hawaii and Florida, where reefs are a critical part of state ecology and economy. read more...

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