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The increased willingness to take a coronavirus vaccine was more pronounced in certain groups, particularly Democrats and Americans between the ages of 45 and 64.Among Democrats, willingness to take a vaccine rose to 69 percent last month from 53 percent in September.Nearly half of Americans between the ages of 45 and 64 49 percent said they were willing to take a vaccine, up from 36 percent in September.In September, President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. said he did not trust President Trump to determine when a vaccine was ready.Let me be clear: I trust vaccines.

The increased willingness to take a coronavirus vaccine was more pronounced in certain groups, particularly Democrats and Americans between the ages of 45 and 64.

Among Democrats, willingness to take a vaccine rose to 69 percent last month from 53 percent in September. Nearly half of Americans between the ages of 45 and 64 — 49 percent — said they were willing to take a vaccine, up from 36 percent in September. Despite the increase, people in that age group remained least likely to say they would get the vaccine.

Democrats have consistently signaled that they were more likely to get vaccinated than Republicans and independents, but there were shared concerns in the late stages of the presidential campaign.

A poll released last month by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that a clear majority of Americans were skeptical about a rushed vaccine, with 62 percent of adults saying they were concerned about the Trump administration pressuring the Food and Drug Administration to approve a coronavirus vaccine before the election.

In September, President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. said he did not trust President Trump to determine when a vaccine was ready. “Let me be clear: I trust vaccines. I trust scientists,” he said. “But I don’t trust Donald Trump, and at this moment, the American people can’t either.”

Lydia Saad, Gallup’s director of U.S. social research, suggested that coronavirus vaccination had become a more rancorous partisan issue, contributing to a decline in confidence among Democrats. Their confidence rebounded somewhat in the latest survey, she said, possibly because the political rhetoric had moved away from the issue.

“People went back to their original tendencies,” she said in an interview.

A rushed approval process for a vaccine was a concern for 37 percent of the adults Gallup polled, while 26 percent said they would wait for confirmation that a vaccine was safe. A smaller group — 12 percent — said they did not trust vaccines in general, reflecting a mistrust of vaccines that has been on the rise across the country in recent years, stemming from the legacy of government experimentation on African-Americans and the disadvantaged as well as distrust of the pharmaceutical industry.